Pronouns - Pronombres Title Image

Spanish-Espanol Home
Index - Indicio
Dictionary - Diccionario

 

Study the words and then try the Pronouns - Pronombres Quiz.

Pronouns are words that take the place of nouns. In Spanish, pronouns are both like and different than in English.

Subject Pronouns

Every sentence has a subject. The subject of the sentence is who or what is doing the action in the sentence or is being described.

In English, the subject pronouns are I, you, he/she/it, we, they.

In Spanish there are several other forms of these subject pronouns. As with many other grammatical forms, there are different gender forms of pronouns.

English Subject Singular Pronoun Spanish Subject Singular Pronoun English Subject Plural Pronoun Spanish Subject Plural Pronoun
I yo We nosotros (masculine or mixed gender group)
nosotras (feminine)
you tú (familiar form used with friends, co-workers, children)
ustede (formal form used with superiors, strangers, children to adults)
you (as in all of you) ustedes (used in Latin American countries for both formal and informal, used in Spain for formal)
vosotros (informal masculine and mixed gender groups -used in Spain)
vosotras (informal feminine - used in Spain)
he
she
él
ella
they ellos (masculine or mixed gender group)
ellas (feminine group)

 

Direct Object of Preposition Pronouns

English Direct Object of Preposition Singular Pronoun Spanish Direct Object of Preposition Singular Pronoun English Direct Object of Preposition Plural Pronoun Spanish Direct Object of Preposition Plural Pronoun
I We nosotros (masculine or mixed gender group)
nosotras (feminine)
you ti (familiar form used with friends, co-workers, children)
usted (formal form used with superiors, strangers, children to adults)
you (as in all of you) ustedes (used in Latin American countries for both formal and informal, used in Spain for formal)
vosotros (informal masculine and mixed gender groups -used in Spain)
vosotras (informal feminine - used in Spain)
he
she
él
ella
they ellos (masculine or mixed gender group)
ellas (feminine group)

 

There are several prepositions that use the subject pronouns rather than the prepositional pronouns with prepositions. They are:

 

Direct Object Pronouns

The object that directly gets or receives the action of the verb is called the direct object. If that direct object noun is replaced by a pronoun, it is a direct object pronoun.

English Direct Object Singular Pronoun Spanish Direct Object Singular Pronoun English Direct Object Plural Pronoun Spanish Direct Object Plural Pronoun
me me us nos
you te (familiar form used with friends, co-workers, children)
lo, la(formal form used with superiors, strangers, children to adults)
you (as in all of you) os (informal)
los, las (formal masculine and mixed gender groups -used in Spain)
he
she
lo
la
them los (masculine or mixed gender group)
las (feminine group)

 

The direct object pronoun comes before the verb in most cases. If the sentence is negative, the pronoun comes between the negative word ("no") and the verb.

When there are two verbs - for example the conjugated verb and an infinitive, you can correctly write it two ways. You can put the direct object pronoun in front of the conjugated verb or attach it to the end of the infinitive.

Lo necessito ver. - I must see it.

Necissito verlo. - I must see it.

 

Indirect Object Pronouns

The indirect object tells "To whom?" or "For whom?" the action of the verb is performed.

English Indirect Object Singular Pronoun Spanish Indirect Object Singular Pronoun English Indirect Object Plural Pronoun Spanish Indirect Object Plural Pronoun
me me us nos
you te (familiar form used with friends, co-workers, children)
le (formal form used with superiors, strangers, children to adults)
you (as in all of you) os (informal)
les (formal masculine and mixed gender groups -used in Spain)
he
she
le
them les

 

The indirect object pronoun comes before the verb in most cases. If the sentence is negative, the pronoun comes between the negative word ("no") and the verb.

When there are two verbs - for example the conjugated verb and an infinitive, you can correctly write it two ways. You can put the indirect object pronoun in front of the conjugated verb or attach it to the end of the infinitive.

Le volvo dar un libro

Volvo darle un libro.

 

Direct Object and Indirect Object Pronouns in the Same Sentence

When you have both a direct object pronoun and an indirect object pronoun in the same sentence, the indirect object pronoun comes first.

Yo le los doy. - I gave them to him.

 

Possessive Pronouns

English Possessive Singular Pronoun Spanish Possessive Singular Pronoun English Possessive Plural Pronoun Spanish Possessive Plural Pronoun
mine el mío / la mía
los míos / las mías
ours el nuestro / la nuestra
los nuestros / las nuestras
your, yours el tuyo / la tuya
los tuyos / las tuyas
(familiar form used with friends, co-workers, children)
l suyo / la suya
los suyos / las suyas
(formal form used with superiors, strangers, children to adults)
yours (as in all of you) el vuestro / la vuestra
los vuestros / las vuestras (Familiar)
el suyo / la suya
los suyos / las suyas
(Formal)
his
hers
l suyo / la suya
los suyos / las suyas
theirs el suyo / la suya
los suyos / las suyas

 

This list differs slightly in usage from possessive pronoun/adjectives. The list is here:

English Singular Pronoun - Adjectives Spanish Singular Pronoun - Adjectives English Plural Pronoun - Adjectives Spanish Plural Pronoun - Adjectives
my mi/mis our nuestro - nuestra
nuestros - nuestras
your, yours tu/tus
(familiar form used with friends, co-workers, children)
su/sus
(formal form used with superiors, strangers, children to adults)
yours (as in all of you) vuestro - vuestra
vuestros - vuestras (Familiar)
el suyo / la suya
los suyos / las suyas
(Formal)
his
her
su/sus
theirs su - sus

 

Here are several sample sentences to show the difference in usage;

Mi gato es bonito. - My cat is pretty. (Possessive adjective - pronoun in which my describes the noun cat)

El mio es bonito - Mine is pretty. (The possessive pronoun mine alone with cat inferred).

Another way one can express possession is to say:

El gato es de ella. - The cat is hers.

Notice that the article is not in front of the ella.